Baby-Feeding_guide_charts

Baby_Feeding_Guide_and_Growth_Charts

In this Baby Feeding guide  you will lean how to feeding your baby with Milk ,the basis of your baby’s diet for the first year of her life, even once she has started on solid foods. Breastfeeding is by far the best food for your baby, with a host of benefits; but if you’re unable to Lactate, bottle-feeding provides all the nutrients your baby needs.

 The benefits of Baby Feeding Guide and tips

 BREAST IS BEST A great deal of research has been done about the benefits of breastfeeding, and it’s clear that it provides the perfect start for your baby, affecting her health and development on many levels.

The composition of breast milk changes constantly, adapting to your baby’s needs. Research shows that breastfed babies have fewer incidences of vomiting and diarrhea and that they’re protected against gastroenteritis, as well as ear infections, respiratory illnesses, pneumonia, bronchitis, kidney infections, and septicemia (blood poisoning).

There is also a reduced risk of constipation and other digestive disorders.A comfortable feeding Taking a break to burp your baby mid-feeding helps keep her comfortable and may reduce spitting up.

The best start Breastfeeding your baby gives her the best possible nutritional start in life as well as having benefits for you too.

The fat contained in human milk, compared with cow’s milk, is more digestible for babies, allowing greater absorption of fat-soluble

vitamins into the bloodstream from the intestine.

This is important because healthy fats, including essential fatty acids, are necessary for healthy growth and optimum development, particularly in the brain.

Breast milk also promotes growth because of the presence of certain hormones.

There is a reduced risk of childhood diabetes in breast-fed babies, as well as protection against allergies, asthma, and eczema. Most important, though, there is a reduced risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome);

research showed that of every 87 deaths from SIDS, only three took place in breast-fed babies.

The emotional benefits are great too, as breast-fed babies enjoy a very close connection with their mothers, and skin-to-skin contact nurtures bonding.

 

SUCCESSFUL BREAST FEEDING

 SUCCESSFUL_BREAST_FEEDING

 

Some women adjust to breast feeding very quickly and easily; others find that it takes a little longer, but once underway, it’s enjoyable,

convenient, and usually problem-free. You can also relax in the knowledge that your baby will grow and develop at optimum levels.

 Studies show that women who feed on demand are likely to breast-feed longer.

Feeding on demand also prevents problems with milk supply, and encourages emotional security, since you’re meeting your baby’s

needs when she needs you to. It’s important to take care of yourself when you are breast-feeding.

 

Breastfeeding is Baby’s First  best Meal

Many new mothers state clearly in their birth plans that they want to breast-feed their newborn immediately after his delivery.

This is a well-intentioned request because we have good data that show that if a baby breastfeeds before being taken from the mother to be bathed after his birth,the mother has a much higher chance of successfully breastfeeding that baby.

But an even more natural way to begin the breastfeeding process is to give the newborn time to seek out his first meal by himself. Ask someone to place your newborn on your stomach before he is bathed or evaluated .

Cuddle, make eye contact, and then watch what the baby will do instinc-tively.

He will first begin to act hungry by smacking his lips. He will then start pushing his feet against your body to work his way up to the breast.

(I believe this is why babies are born with the stepping reflex that causes  them to move their feet and legs as if they are trying to walk when some thing is pushed against their feet.)

He will navigate his way to your breast by following the scent of the amniotic fluid.

(The breasts secrete an oily substance containing some of the same ingredients.)

He will suck on his fists, get the scent of the fluid that is still on his skin, and then head up toward the breast by pushing, stretching, and inching his way along.

When he makes this journey to the breast by himself, the latch-on is much more likely to be a healthy one in which he gets the whole nipple and areola.

The breastfeeding is then far easier for both baby and mom and makes it more likely that the breastfeeding attempt will be successful.

If the baby’s hands have already been washed,or if your breasts have been overly cleansed,the baby won’t be able to make the journey.

That’s why it’s important to plan for this little bit of exercise in your birth plan.

This first supper is an Olympic achievement for both of you. And for most healthy babies, it’s a good reason to delay washing, eye ointment, weighing, measuring, shots, or procedures for the first hour

 

Starting to breastfeed 

Although breast-feeding is a natural process, there are a few “aids” to help ensure that feeding your baby runs as smoothly as possible for you both.

 good_support_breast_feeding

A good support You’ll need at least two nursing bras, professionally fitted, if possible.

Look for supportive bras with fastenings that can be opened with one hand.

Breast_pumps

Breast pumps  There is a wide variety of pumps; you may need to experiment to find

which one you prefer. Electric pumps are efficient, but some find them invasive.

 

Nipple_shields

Nipple shields  These can be useful in the short term if you have sore, cracked or

inverted nipples but they can make it harder for babies to get milk.

 

breast_Gel_pads

Gel pads Absorbent gel pads soothe the nipple area if you have discomfort. Keep

them in the freezer or fridge and then pop them inside your bra after feeding.

 

Breast_pads_creams_Pads

Breast pads and creams Pads  This is  helpful if your breasts leak. Choose ones without a plastic backing, which can irritate. Lanolin based creams can help soothe sore nipples.

 

Feeding_cushion

Feeding cushion A V-shaped cushion is ideal for breast-feeding since it supports your back, baby, and arms. Since some feedings can last a while, comfort is a must!

 

Skin-to-skin_contact

Skin-to-skin contact Close contact immediately after the birth helps promote bonding and establish breast-feeding, as well as stabilizing your baby’s temperature, breathing, heart rate, and blood sugar.

 

Nighttime_feedings

Nighttime feedings Despite what other moms might say, all young babies need to feed at night and will continue to do so for the first few months. Keeping the lights dim and changing her diaper before a feeding may help her get back to sleep afterward.

Successful  Baby Feeding  Once breast-feeding is established, there can be no better and easier way to feed your baby. Most moms report an intense closeness with their babies during feeding, which helps your baby feel more secure.

Predictable routines  It will become easier to distinguish between your baby’s different cries,and play with him or simply cuddle him when he needs something more than milk.

Feeding times will be more predictable, and you should be able to establish some sort of a routine as your baby gains weight and begins naturally to establish his own pattern, usually from around four to six weeks.

Longer sleeps The engorged and uncomfortable feeling of the early days soon settles down, as your breasts adjust to producing just the right amount for your baby.

Also,your baby will become a seasoned expert at feeding quickly and efficiently often from both breasts at one sitting. You’ll find, too, that he goes longer between feedings, which will mean a little more sleep for you.

Settling in  Getting comfortable before a feeding and relaxing for the duration makes the experience more positive, and helps your milk flow. Try not to worry about other things; instead, settle in and enjoy the experience of feeding your baby.

Well hydrated  You can’t underestimate the importance of staying hydrated while feeding. Drink a glass of water each time you feed your baby. Plenty of fluids help to keep you energized and help prevent problems such as blocked ducts and mastitis.

An additional supply Once feeding is established you can get into the habit of expressing milk and freezing it, so that you can get out on your own when you feel that you need a break.

Public feeding Not all women feel comfortable feeding in public, but try to remember that it’s a natural activity. There are now plenty of mother and baby rooms if you do want some privacy.

baby immune system development chart- Growth Charts For Breast-fed Babies

Boys_wieght_chart

 

Girls_Wieght_Chart

 

How to Expressing and storing breast milk

Many moms find that expressing gives them more freedom, since dad or a babysitter can help with feeding. If you’re returning to work, expressing and storing a supply means that your baby still benefits from your breast milk.

Starting to express

There are no rights and wrongs, but consider these factors before starting to express your milk.

Get established first Milk

production is based on supply and demand, so when your baby nurses, more milk is produced to meet her needs.If you express regularly, your milk will increase to ensure that the same quantity is available.

It’s a good idea to wait until your milk supply is established and your babyis feeding well and regularly, and putting on weight, before you start to express. Once your supply is established, you can begin to express  and freeze or refrigerate your milk.

 

Wait a while

Your baby may experience “nipple confusion” if you offer a bottle too early, and may want to be bottle-fed if she finds this easier.

For this reason, it’s best towait until she is baby breast feeding well before introducing her to a bottle.

Practice with a bottle

 Once you decide to give an occasional bottle, you’ll have to teach your baby how to suck from it. You can try offering her a little water daily from a bottle first so that she gets used to the different way of feeding.

 

  • Start manually

expressing by putting your hand about an inch or so back from your areola, and use your other fingers to cup your breast. Using your thumb and forefingers, press gently into your breast. Press and then release.

 

  • Find a rhythm

that is comfortable for you, and, as you do so, imagine your baby. Rotate your hand around your areola, which can encourage your milk to flow. If nothing seems to work, try pressing a little farther back from the nipple.

 

  • Have a clean bowl

or sterilized bottle to collect the milk. Express each breast until the flow slows down perhaps five minutes or so then switch to the other side. You may want to go back and forth a few times.

 

  • Label your milk

with the date that it has been expressed before putting it in the freezer. It’s important to ensure that the milk stays fresh, so as soon as it’s labeled, store it in the fridge or freezer (see opposite).

 

Dispelling Breast Feeding Myths and the Truth

 The sheer volume of breastfeeding advice you receive can be confusing,

so it’s important to be able to distinguish fact from fiction.

Here are some  of the most common misconceptions

 

Myth #1
Babies who breast feed very often probably aren’ t getting enough milk.
Reality
The frequency of feedings is not an indicator of whether or
not your baby is getting enough breast milk.
The facts
If you are feeding on demand, which many pediatricians and
breastfeeding advocates recommend, then you might feel
that your baby is constantly at the breast and you may worry
that he’ s not getting enough milk.
But assuming you havedeveloped a steady supply of milk,
that you aren’ t limiting feeding times, and that your baby is latching
on to the breast correctly, it’ s likely that he’ s simply having a classic growth spurt.
The more you feed him, the more milk you will naturally produce for his growing appetite!

Myth #2

If you are breastfeeding, you must always offer both breasts
at each feeding for equal amounts of time.
Reality
It ’ s more important to let your baby fi nish with one breast
first, even if that means she doesn’ t take the second breast at
the same feeding.
The facts
Each time you breastfeed, you produce different types of
milk.Foremilk is the initial breast milk that a baby drinks
when she nurses at the beginning of a feeding. It resembles
skim milk high in volume but low in fat and calories. As
the feeding progresses, the fat content of your breast milk
increases and it begins to more closely resemble whole milk.
Finally, toward the end of the feeding, your baby drinks hind
milk, which is highest in calories and fat, and low in volume.

 

Myth #3

No spicy foods or alcohol if you are breast - feeding!

Reality

You can have a beer with your enchiladas.

The facts

If you ’ re consuming a healthful, balanced diet, you needn ’ t be

obsessive about restricting certain foods and  beverages from your  diet.

Even  if  you  make  poor  food  choices,  your  baby

will  still  extract  the  nutrition  he  requires  from  your  breast

milk; but chances are you ’ ll feel a lot better if you eat a good diet.

 

Myth #04

You must drink milk to make milk.

Reality

While getting enough fluid is important, milk consumption

is not essential.

The facts

While it would be nice to think that consuming large amounts

of milk (especially in the form of a favorite ice cream or

shake) automatically ensures a steady supply of breast milk,

it ’ s not true. Since you ’ re losing fluids when you breastfeed,

it makes sense to supplement them regularly, but water will do the job, too.

If you are concerned about your calcium consumption, then by all means drink milk (fat free or reduced fat are the healthiest choices,

and try other forms of dairy or other calcium rich foods), but there are no set recommendations for nursing mothers on milk consumption.

 

Myth #05

If you develop an illness or infection or are taking medication, stop nursing.

Reality

In most such cases, there is no reason to discontinue breastfeeding.

The facts

If you develop a common infection whether it ’ s a breast

infection (mastitis) or an illness like strep throat or a bad

coldthere is no need to stop breast feeding. In fact, with

regard to breast infections,

they clear up faster if you continue to feed with the affected breast.

Your baby probably already has the same germs that caused you to get sick, and

you ’ re actually boosting his immunity naturally by feeding

him breast milk.

 

Myth #06

No spicy foods or alcohol if you are breast - feeding!

Reality

You can have a beer with your enchiladas.

The facts

If you ’ re consuming a healthful, balanced diet, you needn ’ t be obsessive about restricting certain foods and beverages from your diet.

Even if you make poor food choices, your baby will still extract the nutrition he requires from your breast milk;

but chances are you ’ ll feel a lot better if you eat a good diet. So, is it true that if you eat garlic or onions or cabbage,and drink liquor, your baby will have an upset tummy.

 

Myth #07

You must drink milk to make milk.

Reality

While getting enough fl uid is important, milk consumption is not essential.

The facts

While it would be nice to think that consuming large amounts

of milk (especially in the form of a favorite ice cream or

shake) automatically ensures a steady supply of breast milk,

it ’ s not true. Since you ’ re losing fl uids when you breast - feed,

it makes sense to supplement them regularly, but water

A breast - fed baby can successfully learn to switch

back and forth from breast to bottle (this is a practical

concern for nursing mothers who go back to work and

continue to breast - feed when they are home); she can

also use a pacifier to satisfy her need to suck between

feedings. There is no science to suggest that pacifiers

cause medical or psychological problems.

 

Myth #08

If you develop an illness or infection or are taking medication, stop nursing.

Reality

In most such cases, there is no reason to discontinue breast feeding.

The facts

If you develop a common infection  whether it ’ s a breast

infection (mastitis) or an illness like strep throat or a bad

cold  there is no need to stop breast - feeding. In fact, with

regard to breast infections, they clear up faster

if you continue to feed with the affected breast.

Your baby probably already has the same germs that caused you to get sick, and you ’ re actually boosting his immunity naturally by feeding him breast milk.

 

Myth #09

If your baby has diarrhea or is vomiting, stop breast - feeding.

Reality

You can safely nurse your sick baby.

The Fact

If your baby develops a stomach bug and begins throwing up

or having bouts of diarrhea, it turns out the best

fl uid she can ingest is breast milk.

If you have an older baby who is already taking solid foods,

you may try stopping the solid foods (check with your pediatrician first) to

help with the tummy problems, but don ’ t withhold breast milk.

Breastfeeding is very popular in some areas of the country and not-so-popular

in other regions. If you’re leaning toward the bottle because you can’t

stand the idea of turning your chest into a snack bar, try to have an open

mind about the whole thing. Give it a shot. You may be surprised at how

easily Baby takes to the breast, and how you really don’t mind so much after all.

 

Breastfeeding pros:

  • You never have to mix or warm a bottle, which is a great perk when

Baby cries at 2 a.m.

  • It’s free.
  • Very low possibility of allergic reactions.
  • Studies show that breastfeeding gives Baby a permanent boost to her

immune system (she gets a healthy dose of your antibodies every time

she nurses).

  • Breastfed babies are less likely to suffer from constipation and gas.
  • It really is a sweet way to bond with your child.

 

Breastfeeding cons:

  • It may be painful  at first. When your milk comes in, your breasts

might feel like hot rocks, and until your nipples are used to Baby’s suck-

ing, they may be sore, too.

  • Risk of nipple and breast infection (mastitis). If Baby is an eager little

eater, or isn’t latching on the right way, your nipple could develop a

crack, which might allow germs from Baby’s mouth into your breast.

  • You’re the sole provider of food for your child, which keeps you incredibly busy, particularly during the first few weeks, when Baby feeds at

least eight to ten times per day.

  • You have to watch what you eat. Strong or acidic foods, like garlic or

tomatoes, may cause your milk to smell funny, which may lead to Baby’s

refusal to eat. Caffeine and alcohol also enter the breast milk, and limit-

ing their use is recommended while breastfeeding.

  • You have to deal with leakage. Investing in some thick, cotton nursing

pads and wearing dark tops can help eliminate embarrassing moments.

 

Conclusion

Though most doctors will tell you that breastfeeding is best for Baby, it’s not

always possible   for a variety of reasons. If Mom is sick after delivery, for

example, she may not be able to nurse. There’s also always the possibility of

Mom having inverted nipples (which make it extremely difficult for Baby to

latch on) or simply not producing enough milk. Not to worry. Baby can get all

of the nourishment she needs from a bottle of formula.

 

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